Some assembly required

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Hey Folks,

If you’ve been paying attention, you know that for the past two months I’ve been working on a set of dining chairs to go with the staked leg tables that I have for sale at the shop.  The chairs (and tables) are the design of Christopher Schwarz, from his book, “The Anarchist Design Book”, available from Lost Art Press.  This is the same design as used for Le Chaise d’Enfer.

This is only the second set of dining chairs that I have built, the last one was thirty (yes 30) years ago and is still functioning well, so that’s an encouragement.  The big difference is that these chairs require a great deal more hand work than most as they were designed to be built by hand.  They also have a number compound angles that complicate their construction.

Normally, when building repetitive objects, there is some saving in cost or labor in scaling up production.  In building these chairs however, making five chairs really is five times the work!

So to tally up, that’s:

 Five chair seats.
Five steam bent crest rails.
Twenty back spindles.
Twenty legs.
Twenty wedges.
Twenty pins.
Eighty holes bored.
Eighty tenons turned.
Twenty holes taper reamed.
Twenty matching tapers turned.
Forty tapers planed.
Forty additional facets planed.

Did I leave anything out?  Oh yeah, there’s a couple of spares of most everything in case of accidents.

As I mentioned, assembly comes next then finishing.  This is not over by a long shot, but perhaps, “…it is the end of the beginning”.

Cheers,
Tom

Four down, eighteen to go

Legs that is (are).

My current project is a set of dining side chairs to complement the round, staked leg tables that I currently have for sale.  These chairs are from Christopher Schwarz, “Anarchist Design Book” and are the same design as “le chaise d’enfer”, which I made as a practice/prototype.  I am making five chairs and so I need twenty legs, plus a couple for insurance.

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After the legs are roughed out square and cut to length, they are tapered on the jointer.  Then comes the fun part, planing the squares into octagons.

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This part is done by hand and takes a bit of time and some muscle, …muscles that I haven’t used for awhile, or so my body reminds me.  The wood is black ash and planes well but does create a good deal of friction.  Fortunately, a quick rub down with a wad of waxed paper makes things go surprisingly smoother.

BTW- that pile of shavings is from two legs and each one represents a single stroke with the plane.

My latest woodworking project

Well, sort of anyway.

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In case you haven’t been following Seattle weather lately, it’s rained steadily for over 30 days, and it’s been chilly.  Since I’ve no desire to be electrocuted by my chainsaw in a downpour, my wood box has run empty.  Today was pretty decent by Seattle standards (i.e. dry), so the day was spent cutting firewood.

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Actually, being cooped up all that time gave me an opportunity to carve a kitchen spoon for a couple of friends with a surplus of chickens.  I sensed that there’s a lot of chicken soup in their futures.  It’s made from a green piece of red alder firewood that I nicked from their farm a couple of weeks ago.

Congratulations, you’ve got worms !

So, I gave the mother of my god-daughters a worm bin for Christmas.  It’s nearly identical to the one which I described in my previous post.  The only significant difference is that this one came with a half pound of red wiggler composting worms.

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We packed up the bin (and other gifts) and embarked upon a long road trip from Seattle to Huntington Beach, California; five days away.  The worms were ordered before we left, with explicit instruction that they should arrive the day AFTER Christmas.  So what could go wrong?

Well, after two days on the road, we were eating dinner in the hotel restaurant when I got a text from the lady herself reading…,

“Did you guys send me a box of worms?”

I immediately thought, “Is there anyway for things to go more sideways than this? Now I have some explaining to do.”  She said that fortunately she had a glass of wine in hand to soften the blow.  What could I do but wish her a Merry Christmas and suggest that they go best with red wine?

Amazingly, the worms survived for another five days in their box, until we could set up the bin and give them a proper home.  As Kris reminds me, it’s the unexpected that you remember in the long run.

Okay, so not exactly “Fine Woodworking”

Every once and awhile I feel the need for what might be called a “low project”, something made cheap and easily, either just for the fun of it or because it’s a needed utility project for the home or shop.  This time it’s a project that I’ve been wanting to do since high school, …vermicomposting.  Okay, “worm farming” if you must.  The idea is to create a simple system for composting kitchen wastes using worms.

There are many systems for vermicomposting and many designs for composters.  The system and design that I chose comes from the Oregon State University Extension Service.  It’s an ergonomic (back friendly) stacked design that automatically separates the worms from the finished compost (called castings) via screened bottoms in the stacked bins.  The worms naturally move up through the screens to the fresh garbage (yum!)  I did modify the design slightly by offsetting the 2×4 sections in order to create interlocking modules.

Worm composting produces liquid runoff (called compost tea) that collects in the tray. Because it will reside outdoors, I also added a piece of 1″ urethane foam and a seed germination warming mat.   Since it’s going on our patio, I gave it a quick coat of “Old Fashioned Milk Paint” in Lexington Green.

My worms will arrive in a few days.  I’ll add a few new pictures and an update when that happens.  If you would like to try vermicomposting for yourself, I recommend “Worms Eat My Garbage” (1982), by Mary Applehof.

Le Chaise d’Enfer*

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*The Chair from Hell

Hey Folks,

If you read my post about, “My latest mock up“, then you know about this chair.  Suffice to say, it has been a learning experience and I am glad that I used inexpensive lumber for my education.

As promised, the immolation reserved for this piece is shown in the above photo. No easy trip to the wood stove for this tormentor. Oh no, only a trip to the diabolical inferno that is the front window with do.

The finish on the chair is white latex primer, then yellow tinted shellac, followed by a gradient fog  coat of red tinted shellac.  Once the shellac dried, I coated the chair with a gelatin mixture.  When that was dry, a thick coat of black milk paint crackled as it dried.  Finally, the whole thing was coated with a sprayed on coat of Daly’s Pro Fin polyurethane.

Happy Halloween!

P.S.  Here’s the full effect of the front window

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More good stuff from trees

fullsizeoutput_439Hey Folks,

Any woodworker has to love trees.  Trees not only create the basic material for our work, they also provide the mystery of what’s hidden inside them.  Finding the treasure within is part of the joy that comes from woodwork.  But trees also improve the environment in which we live.  They cool the earth, they generate oxygen, and they feed, house and nurture life in and around themselves for decades, even centuries.  So when I met a budding (sorry) young arborist with the goal of increasing folks’ appreciation for trees, I started looking for a way to help out.

Logan Fields runs  Heartwood Nursery, a tree nursery in Port Townsend that specializes in nut and fruit trees.  To promote her business, Logan makes necklaces from the shells of heart nuts.  The heart nut is similar to a walnut but has an iconic shape that lends itself to some creative uses.

I have five of Logan’s necklaces available for sale at the shop, or you can buy them directly from the artist herself, via her website.

Cheers,
Tom